We love the great outdoors!

>More than 60 percent of Bellevue is protected by land conservation. The rolling hills and the meandering Harpeth River create the perfect spot for Nashville residents (and visitors) who want to leave the hustle and bustle of the city behind. The Bellevue community is home to many great outdoor recreational parks and activity centers, and is proud to be the northern trailhead for the unique 444-mile Natchez Trace Parkway.

Bellevue is home to the “crown jewel” of Metro Parks — the Warner Parks, the largest municipally administered parks in Tennessee that together span 2,684 acres of forest and field. A half a million people visit Edwin and Percy Warner parks annually to utilize picnic areas, scenic roadways and overlooks, hiking trails, equestrian center and horse trails, cross country running courses, golf courses, athletic fields, and other amenities. Warner Parks is also an important historical community resource listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Bellevue is a nature lover’s paradise!

Natchez Trace Parkway

Edwin and Percy Warner Parks, collectively known as “The Warner Parks,” are managed by the Metropolitan Board of Parks and Recreation of Nashville and Davidson County. The Warner Parks are the largest municipally administered parks in Tennessee and together span 2,684 acres of forest and field.

Warner Parks website

Nature Center
7311 Highway 100
Nashville, TN 37221
Phone: (615) 352-6299

Park Headquarters and
Friends of Warner Parks
50 Vaughn Road
Nashville, TN 37221

Officially known at Metro’s Bellevue Park. However, with the construction of the Red Caboose Playground on the site and the presence of a full-scale red caboose on the property, the community green space is widely know as Red Caboose Park. The site plays hosts to a number of private and public events, including the annual Bellevue Community Picnic held on the third Saturday of every May.

Metro Parks website

Metro Park, with children’s playground, at Harpeth Knoll Road and Goodpasture Terrace.

Metro Parks website

Edwin and Percy Warner Parks, collectively known as “The Warner Parks,” are managed by the Metropolitan Board of Parks and Recreation of Nashville and Davidson County. The Warner Parks are the largest municipally administered parks in Tennessee and together span 2,684 acres of forest and field.

Warner Parks website

Park Headquarters and
Friends of Warner Parks
50 Vaughn Road
Nashville, TN 37221

Sports fields for Bellevue Sports Athletic Association, Inc., at 621 McPherson Drive, also serves as a trailhead for the Bellevue Harpeth Riverway Greenway.

bsaainc.org

greenwaysfornashville.org

Metro Park, with children’s playground, on Bellevue Road at Old Hickory Boulevard.

Metro Parks website

The Natchez Trace Parkway is a 444-mile drive through exceptional scenery and 10,000 years of North American history. Bellevue is blessed to be the northern gateway for this U.S. National Park. Used by American Indians, “Kaintucks,” settlers, and future presidents, the Old Trace played an important role in American history. Today, visitors can enjoy not only a scenic drive but also hiking, biking, horseback riding, and camping.

Parkway website

Used in conjunction with West Nashville Sports League’s slate of baseball, flag football, and other recreational games.

wnsl.org

Newsom’s Mill ruins are part of the Harpeth River State Park — a linear park managing 40 miles of the Harpeth River that connects several natural, archeological and historic sites including the 1862 Newsom’s Mill ruins and Hidden Lake.

Park maps available on Tennessee State Parks’ website.

There are actually three sections to the Harpeth River Greenway, all in Bellevue, with the longest — Warner Park to Morton Mill — running 7.3 miles of mostly paved trail. Accessible from two trailheads inside Edwin Warner Park, the trail follows the Little Harpeth and Harpeth Rivers through pastoral 260 acre Harpeth Bend section around a golf driving range and through the Morton Mill Trailhead, ending at the train tracks on the north end.

Plans are in place to eventually connect to the Harpeth Youth Soccer Association trail (.6 miles) and the Harpeth River/Riverwalk section (1.7 miles).

greenwaysfornashville.org

Primarily used for HYSA soccer games, the park also offers a trailhead to one of the Metro Greenways and river access.

greenwaysfornashville.org

Hidden Lake is part of the Harpeth River State Park — a linear park managing 40 miles of the Harpeth River that connects several natural, archeological and historic sites including the 1862 Newsom’s Mill ruins.

Park maps available on Tennessee State Parks’ website.